Show me the Money!

Talk by Sumner Davenport / View Slides

Can creating or remediating WordPress sites to include Accessibility increase clients and web designers profits?

Can you measure how much money businesses are losing out on because of a non-Accessible website?

Can profits be lost by designers who are not including Accessibility in their services?

The answer to all of the above is “Yes.”

However, there are misconceptions around the cost/profit of Web Accessibility. Let’s look at statistics, do the math, check out the bottom line and learn how Web Accessibility can affect profitability for both designers and their clients.

Questions on “Show me the Money!

    1. Yes. One such report “The Click-Away Pound Report 2019” states: 69% of disabled people with access needs say they ‘click away’ from a site with barriers. 83% of users with access needs limit their shopping to sites they know are barrier-free.

  1. Do you feel designer & developer reluctance on folding in a11y is that they undercharge or underestimate their bottom lines? How do you recommend they address this or can you share your experience?

    1. I believe that a lot of designers underestimate the value of their services. I see many posts on social media where the question is asked “how much would you charge for….” Although it might be helpful to know what others charge, a price by itself is limiting. There are many factors not taken into consideration. Such as the designers’ experience, their education, how well they know their niche and everything they are including in their design service. Are they writing the content, sourcing the images, including citations and SEO? And what else? When they make a detailed list of their assets and services, it becomes more obvious how much they offer, and this list has a value. As a designer learns a11y and automatically begins to include it in their work, they can then recognize where it makes their work better and increases the value of what they are offering a client. And this added value separates them from other designers who offer less.

  2. Do you feel designer & developer reluctance on folding in ay11 is that they undercharge or underestimate their bottom lines? How do you recommend they address this or can you share your experience?

  3. Do you think that web development is driven too much by developers needing to rapidly solve problems defined by businesses, rather than by users?

    1. Yes. I’ve witnessed many designers that focus only on the problem the client has voiced, instead of educating the client on all the benefits of a well designed website. It gets frustrating when they work themselves int that box. The more a designer can educate the client on all the things the website can do for them the more a client will accept the value of the website.

  4. Do you think that webdevelopment is driven too much by developers needing to rapidly solve problems defined by businesses, rather than by users?

    1. A demand letter is a letter sent from an attorney stating they have a client, usually a blind user, who says they cannot access your website. The user is saying that your website is not accessible to a blind person. The attorney is demanding that you contact their office to discuss the next steps and to prevent them from suing you for lack of accessibility and discrimination under disability rights laws.

  5. If you build the same website with a11y in focus and the same website without a11y. What do you think about the costs of the two websites? A11y website costs more?

    1. That is a question that can’t be answered with a dollar amount. A website that is not accessible is an incomplete website. The designer that can deliver a completed accessible website has delivered something with a higher value.